Batch process a heap of photos in Photoshop CS6

Getting this grid view for you, the reader, was an exercise in batch processing in and of itself. Perhaps there is a built-in preset for this already, but I do not know of one and had to do some digging around:

1. I did the storyboarding in a free IOS app called PAPER. After one week, I don't know how people ever storyboarded without the ease and cross-functionality of Paper. It exports entire works as a .pdf to e-mail, it exports individual "frames" to facebook, twitter, your photo album - it even does your laundry. It might even be able to refinance your home.

2. Of the options from the above laundry list, I exported the entire 42 frames to a .pdf and e-mailed it to myself.

3. I saved the .pdf to my Google Drive.

4. I opened the .pdf straight up in Photoshop CS6 - should be no different for recent versions, particularly the cloud-based one. 

5. Select all images.

5. Select all IMAGES from the .pdf that PAPER exported

5. Select all IMAGES from the .pdf that PAPER exported

6. Open up the ACTIONS box. You're going to record the process of exporting to a .jpg. 

The actions dialog box is under your WINDOW menu.

The actions dialog box is under your WINDOW menu.

7. Click the PAGE icon to create a new recording, name it, and then start recording.

Hit the circular record button to start, the square button to stop.

Hit the circular record button to start, the square button to stop.

8. Save your image as a .jpg. For this exercise, I picked medium quality. I then closed the tab with the image inside Photoshop and hit the stop button on the record. So this action will export an image to my folder (of choice) as a .jpg, then close the blasted image inside of Photoshop so I don't have to deal with it anymore in the batch process (or annoying pop-ups about saving). Now you're ready to tackle the other photos.

The default option when using "Save As" is to save as a .psd - be sure to check .jpg.

The default option when using "Save As" is to save as a .psd - be sure to check .jpg.

9. Batch process - under File, look for Automate, then click on Batch.

Almost done. 

Almost done. 

10. Make sure the BATCH dialog box shows your newly minted action. Check the SOURCE to make sure it's going to pull from your opened files. 

11. Tell the DESTINATION to be a folder. Then CHOOSE which folder - I started with this .pdf in my Google Drive, so I left the contents there in a companion folder called "demo."

Starting serial # by default should be ONE. I started on my #2 image in my sequence of 42 images (I had closed the 1st one in the recording step), and had no problem at all. 

Starting serial # by default should be ONE. I started on my #2 image in my sequence of 42 images (I had closed the 1st one in the recording step), and had no problem at all. 

12. Finito. After executing the batch, check your destination folder. You're done. Apart from the naming scheme, the end products are there and ready to be used. E.g. I uploaded all of them into the grid at the top of this post. 

Jake

Las Vegas

I want to encourage others and bring honor to the Almighty in everything that I do with film and video. My goal is to take the first 11 minutes of my tv pilot and seek out decision-makers who can further the conversation about developing it into a show. If my team and I can do that, then we can teach 100,000 other microbudget filmmakers how to do the same thing so that we might tell stories of hope to millions. In the meantime, I'm a son of the King, a family man, a lifelong student of film, and the author of two microbudget filmmaking books.